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Conversation Soo I am getting interested in making things....

Twitch6000

Person Of All Kinds
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WCG Team Member
#1
Quick story
My Fiance and I are looking into getting my own place soon and have I found interest in getting a rent to own place.. Or to be more specific a fix em upper rent to own.

I have always been more into computers and electronics in general. Where as my brother and most other males in the family have been more mechanically incline. In addition to that they are all like natural handy men. My brother as of late has been working in the shop and making things which has kind of inspired me to build. I have always helped my papaw with various fixes through the house, so I am not completely lost. Again though that was something my brother was better at and usually helped more with. As far as hands on experience goes i'm minimal.. I do want to do the repairs and such that is needed plus more... So to the point of this entire thread..

What would be y'alls suggestion into getting into general handy man work, especially for someone who is a bit on the clumsy? Anything basic I should start with before working up to something major? Safety Suggestions?

I know how to redo floors quite well. I know how to redo water pipes since my papaw works at the water dept. I have went to some jobs with him and helped alot... Taught me real quick that I did not want to work there ... Hence why I stay inside fixing computers haha...

My biggest weakness is probably the fact that I have never really been allowed to use the blades. Unless it is a handsaw.. That is probably what is going to stay my biggest problem,again I am clumsy.

My biggest strengths, I learn from experience.. I can measure really well, I again have done flooring,pipe work, electrical work, replaced ceiling fan, set up a light switch, and other basic things like that.


Looking at some of the places, the usual fixes are dry walling, building a porch or fixing , redoing flooring, redoing doors or doorknobs. If it requires roofing I look elsewhere. My feet stay on the ground lol..
 

Lord Chance

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#2
As with anything, a willingness to try new skills puts you ahead of the game. There are steps you follow in every trade. My grandfather was a black smith. My father a welder while I learned electronics and business. To learn what you need to know just takes patience. There are books and how-to videos in plenty or you can do like I did, find a friend who will teach you. Someone who will spend a weekend showing you how to build a set of steps. How to properly hang drywall. How to wire a light socket. Were I close, I would be pleased to show you around residential electrical wiring. I can even do a bit of plumbing. The one thing you must always be aware of is your local building codes before you do anything. That one bit of knowledge will save you money and keep code enforcement out of your back pocket. ;)
 

veeg

Live Long And Eat Bacon
Moderator
WCG Team Member
#3
Well if you are going to try using a skill saw,you need a firm hand at this and a lot of focus or you can get hurt.. Unless the entire drywall needs re-placing i use a patch myself. Also when looking for a en-expensive fixer upper,please check the neighborhood,as a lot of those houses are not in the best hoods... I do a lot of my own repairs so just ask away...:)
 

Rustys

Well-Known Member
#4
Could also go to yard/garage swap meet find some ratty looking furniture and redo it.

Do not be overly cautious that can get you hurt (it has me) too.
 

Twitch6000

Person Of All Kinds
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WCG Team Member
#5
Thank you y'alls input :).

Any decent youtube channel with good tutorials that meet usual codes?
 

Lord Chance

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#9

Lord Chance

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#11
Short term memory my friend... yeah watched that show for some 20 years and the woodwright shop.
I loved the WoodWright Shop. My grandfather was a blacksmith so I enjoyed seeing the host use the old wood working tools that my grandfather would make and sharpen. I also enjoyed watching the New Yankee Workshop. :)
 

veeg

Live Long And Eat Bacon
Moderator
WCG Team Member
#12
I loved the WoodWright Shop. My grandfather was a blacksmith so I enjoyed seeing the host use the old wood working tools that my grandfather would make and sharpen. I also enjoyed watching the New Yankee Workshop. :)
Yep...i like to use some old hand tools when i can...always wanted to do some smithing tho...
 

Lord Chance

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#16
When you make a cut remember to cut to the waste side of the line. The kerf of a saw is 1/8". If you cut the line you will cut 1/16th to 1/8th inch short. When you measure a cut on a table saw you measure to the set of the blade. The set in a saw blade is the offset of the blade tooth which alternates to the left and right of the blade. Measuring from the guide fence to the tooth that is set closest to the fence will give you an accurate cut. Also when measuring a cut on a table saw measure your cut from the front or infeed side of the blade as well as the back or outfeed side of the blade. This is to insure your guide fence and saw blade are parallel.
 

Twitch6000

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WCG Team Member
#17
Damn this thread is taking off like a rocket haha. Thank you everyone for your input.

I think I am going to take that old furniture idea up for my starter project.